Roles

Change Manager

The Change Manager represents the Programme Executives’ interests in the final outcome, for one or more specific parts of the organisation that will be changed. ‘Change’ is the change in the way in which the organisation will function by the time it reaches the end point defined in the strategy. This can be a change to business processes, organisation structure, capabilities, location and premises, products, market, channels to market, etc.

The Change Manager is responsible for the management of change activities, and must ensure that other managers, staff, stakeholders are all informed and involved throughout the life of the programmes. The strategy may require considerable change in the business. This may cause fear and uncertainty. Some people make create barriers and obstacles, which prevent proper progress on the strategic programme. The Change Manager must work with such people, helping and influencing them to overcome such barriers and obstacles. See also: The Strategy Team’s overall responsibilities

The Change Manager must ensure the approach taken to managing risks is appropriate.

The Change Manager ensures that the organisation is able to realise the benefits from the new capabilities. There is a fundamental difference between the delivery of the new capability and actually realising benefits as a result of implementing that capability. This difference is reflected in the complementary roles of Programme Manager and Change Manager.

Back to top

Contributors

These are all of the other people involved in the programmes and project who are not filling one the specific roles described. They could be but are not limited to –

Back to top

Programme Assurance

Project Executive members as often not full time. They rely heavily on information from the Programme and Project Managers. Whilst they get comfort from the receipt of regular reports and communications, they need to have independent assurance that everything is going as the programme/Project Manager describes. This is the Programme Assurance role.

Programme Assurance responsibilities belong to the Programme Executive, they can, and often do, delegate all or part of the role, but never to the Programme/Project Manager.

Assurance covers all of the interest of the programme, Business, User and Supplier.

This role must be independent of the Programme/Project Manager and Team Managers.

Specific Responsibilities

Back to top

Programme Executive (Programme Director)

The Executive will have overall control of the Functional Programme. One person or a team may fill this role. If the latter, then one member of the team should be designated chairperson (called Programme Director), and one member given the responsibility for day-to-day duties. The Change Manager and Technical Authority will normally be members of the Executive. The Programme Manager will normally attend meetings but will not be a decision maker. This role includes delegating authority to the Project Boards.

Specific Responsibilities

Back to top

Programme Manager

The Programme Manager establishes and manages the overall programme plan. The role carries out day-to-day management of the portfolio of projects in the programme. To this the Programme Manager must ensure that the management and support environment for each project is adequate. Project progress, risks, issues, changes, variances and exceptions must be monitored. It is particularly important that the Programme Manager takes early control of any problems which impact more than one project on the programme.

The programme Manager and the Change Manager compliment each other to deliver the benefits. The Programme Manager has the prime responsibility to deliver the improved capability, whilst the Change Manager must ensure that capability is integrated into the business operations to produce the benefits desired.

The Programme Manager is the link between the projects the Functional Programme and the strategic programme.

Specific Responsibilities

Back to top

Project Assurance

Project Board members as often not full time. They rely heavily on information from the Project Manager. Whilst they get comfort from the receipt of regular reports and communications from the Project Manager, they need to have independent assurance that everything is going as the Project Manager describes. This is the Project Assurance role.

Project Assurance responsibilities belong to the Project Board, they can, and often do, delegate all or part of the role, but never to the Project Manager.

Assurance covers all of the interest of the project, Business, User and Supplier.

This role must be independent of the Project Manager and Team Managers.

Specific Responsibilities

Back to top

Project Board

Appointed by the Programme Executive to provide overall direction and management of the project. The Board is accountable for the success of the project. It has delegated authority as defined in the project mandate, passed to it from the Programme Executive. The Board is also responsible for communication to those outside of the project.

Specific Responsibilities

The following are specific members of the Project Board, and each has their own responsibilities.

Project Executive

The Executive is ultimately responsible for the project, supported by the Senior User and Senior Supplier. The Executive has to ensure that the project is value for money, ensuring a cost-conscious approach to the project, balancing the demands of the business, User and Supplier. Throughout the project, the Executive "owns" the Business Case.

Specific Responsibilities

The Executive is also responsible for the overall business assurance of the project, that is it must deliver all its products as specified, on time, in budget and to agreed quality standards.

Project Manager

The Project Manager is given the authority to run the project on a day to day basis, within constraints and tolerance set by the Project Board.

The prime responsibility is to make sure the Project Board and stakeholders are comfortable that the solution is likely to produce the required benefits. This solution will require the project to deliver products. The role must ensure the project delivers these products, on time, in budget and to agreed quality standards.

Specific Responsibilities

Back to top

Programme Support

Project Support

All programmes and projects require a degree of administration. Some larger and more complex programmes/projects will need specialised planning and other tools. It will often not be appropriate for the Programme/Project Manager to fill this role. If the administration is more than trivial the Programme/Project Manager will too expensive a resource. The Programme/Project Manager will understand what is required from specialist tools, but may not have enough expertise to get the best out of them in a cost effective manner. It is for these reasons that Programme/Project Support can be a valuable role. The role will often support many projects and programmes.

Usually the role will cover three sets of functions, project administration, project configuration, and use of specialist tools

Specific Responsibilities

Administration

Configuration Librarian

Specialist Knowledge, Tools and Advice

Back to top

Senior Supplier

Represents the interests of those designing, developing, facilitating, procuring, implementing, operating and maintaining the project products. Has the authority to commit or acquire Supplier resources. Can share the Technical Authority role.

Specific Responsibilities

Supplier Assurance Responsibilities

The Senior Supplier is responsible for the project assurance of specialist products. This part of the Senior Supplier Role can be in whole or in part delegated.

Back to top

Senior User

The Senior User is responsible for the specification of the needs of all those who will use the final products, for user liaison with the project team, and for monitoring that the solution will meet those needs within the constraints of the Business Case in terms of quality, functionality and ease of use.

The role represents the interests of all those who will use the final products of the project, those for whom the products will achieve an objective, or those who will use the products to deliver benefits. The Senior User role commits user resources and monitors products against requirements. This role may require more than one person to cover all the user interests. For the sake of effectiveness the role should not be split between too many people.

Specific Responsibilities

User Assurance Responsibilities

The Senior User is responsible for the project assurance of products that will be used by the users. This part of the Senior User Role can be delegated, in whole or in part.

Strategic Change Manager

The Strategic Change Manager represents the Strategic Programme Executives’ interests in the final outcome, and is the guardian of the strategy’s business case for funding the strategic programme. ‘Change’ is the change in the way in which the organisation will function by the time it reaches the end point defined in the strategy. This can be a change to business processes, organisation structure, capabilities, location and premises, products, market, channels to market, etc.

The Strategic Change Manager is responsible for the management of change activities, and must ensure that other managers, staff, stakeholders are all informed and involved throughout the life of the programmes. The strategy may require considerable change in the business. This may cause fear and uncertainty. Some people make create barriers and obstacles, which prevent proper progress on the strategic programme. The Strategic Change Manager must work with such people, helping and influencing them to overcome such barriers and obstacles. See also: The Strategy Team’s overall responsibilities

The Strategic Change Manager must ensure the approach taken to managing risks is appropriate.

The Strategic Change Manager oversees the Functional Programmes and ensures that the organisation is able to realise the benefits from the new capabilities. There is a fundamental difference between the delivery of the new capability and actually realising benefits as a result of implementing that capability. This difference is reflected in the complementary roles of Strategic Programme Manager and Strategic Change Manager.

In a smaller organisation or where the strategy is not complex, consider whether the Strategic Change Manager and (programme) Change Manager roles can be filled by one person.

Back to top

Strategic Programme Executive (Strategic Programme Director)

The Executive will have overall control of the strategic programme. One person or a team may fill this role. If the latter, then one member of the team should be designated chairperson (called Programme Director), and one member given the responsibility for day-to-day duties. The Change Manager and Technical Authority will normally be members of the 1Executive. The Strategic Programme Manager will normally attend meetings but will not be a decision maker. This role includes delegating authority to the Functional Programme executives, or if this layer is not present to the Project Boards.

The Strategic Programme Executive will be appointed by Senior Management (the Sponsoring Group for the Organisation’s strategy).

Specific Responsibilities

See also: The Strategy Team’s overall responsibilities

Back to top

Strategic Programme Manager

The Strategic Programme Manager establishes and manages the Strategic Programme Plan. This involves day-to-day management of a portfolio of Functional Programmes, or if this layer is not present, a portfolio of projects.

The Strategic Programme Manager must ensure that functional programmes or projects are started in a controlled manner. This is one of the most important parts of the role. When the strategic programme was established, the business will have made priority decisions. This will have been done to give what it considered to be the best chance of realising the benefits needed to achieve the strategy’s goals and objectives. If functional programmes or projects are started out of sequence and or late, this is likely to reduce the chance of delivering those benefits. This aspect of the role will also be important when new opportunities arise in the middle of the strategic cycle. These opportunities must be reviewed in a controlled manner and only introduced if they offer a better return on investment than other projects in the programmes.

The Manager must ensure the programmes and projects are managed in a controlled manner. In particular, the Manager must ensure that these Functional Programmes and projects do not exceed the authorisations given. These authorisations will cover budget, scope and defined work. Most programmes and projects will be organised into releases, phases or stages. A new release, phase or stage must not start until authorised by the Strategic Programme Executive.

Feedback from the Functional Programmes and projects is critical to assessing whether the strategy is likely to be successful. A critical point for gathering this feedback is at the end of a programme or project. The Manager must ensure they are closed properly, lessons learned documented and benefits measured.

Risks and issues must be logged and managed. These will come from the Functional Programmes and projects, where the impact goes beyond the their boundaries, and may have a detrimental affect on the strategy.

The strategy may require considerable change in the business. This may cause fear and uncertainty. Some people make create barriers and obstacles, which prevent proper progress on the strategic programme. The Strategic Programme Manager must work with such people, helping and influencing them to overcome such barriers and obstacles. See also: The Strategy Team’s overall responsibilities

The Strategic Programme Manager and the Strategic Change Manager compliment each other to deliver the benefits. The Programme Manager has the prime responsibility to ensure the functional programmes and their projects deliver the improved capability, whilst the Strategic Change Manager must ensure that the capability delivered by those programmes is integrated into the business operations to produce the benefits desired.

The Strategic Programme Manager is the link between the Strategic Programme Executive and the Functional Programme Executives, or Project Boards if this layer is not present. The person appointed will often attend the Functional Programme Executive meetings, or Project Board Meetings.

Specific Responsibilities

Back to top

Team Manager

Sometimes the nature of a project means it is better to delegate the management of parts of the project to a Team Manager. This could be due to the size of the project, geographical distribution, or the need for specialist teams.

The prime responsibility of this role is to deliver s defined set of products as instructed by the Project Manager, to an agreed time and cost and to appropriate quality standards.

Specific Responsibilities

Back to top

Technical Authority (or Design Authority)

This Technical Authority is responsible for ensuring the programmes and projects comply with the organisation’s strategy. The role must ensure that the components of the programmes and projects are consistent in accordance with standards and policies in force. These may be legal, regulatory, technical, contractual or corporate directives. To achieve this the Authority must ensure that the interfaces (communications) between programmes, projects and the guardians of the organisations’ standards and policies, are adequate.

Specific Responsibilities

Back to top